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时间:2020-05-26 05:29:40 作者:喜马拉雅 浏览量:67437

AG官网【ag88.shop】途牛 ofQ987e1The big, bea/【utiful Baltic Sea 【/hides /a dirty secret in its 377,00】0km of water.A\ 【number of agricultural/ spills has turned t】he Baltic【 into one of /t/he most /pol】lu\ted】 seas in】 the wor】ld, due to excess nitrogen \and phos\phorus lacing it】s wat【ers.This process of eutrophication ha\s【 led to \the de\pl/etion \/of oxyg】en and /an【 overg\】rowt【h of algae in the body o【f wa】ter, 【but not 【al\l h】ope/ is 【】lo】st.\Eutrophication ex/p】lai【nedAn unlik】ely assist/an】tMussel farms lik\e【 Kieler Meeresfarm【 in the Germ【an port city of Kie】l are ho/p】ing 【to ma【ke a dif】f【eren】ce in th/e 【Baltic'】s/ increasin\g【ly di【fficult fight\ against algae.Hundreds o【f tho】usands of th\ese mighty mol/lus\cs wo/rk to filter the water eve/ry day by\ eating their way through microsc】opic a\lg】ae.Kieler Meeresfarm 】is just one f】arm taking pa\rt in Balt/ic Blue Growth, an experimental【 Europe/an pro】ject coordinated based in\ Sweden's Ostergötland region.Th【e】 p/roj【ect is worth 4.6 million Euros, with/ 3.6 million 】Euros coming from regional aid under the EU Coh/esion Policy. 18【 partners in six B【altic co【untrie】s are taking p/art.All six participating farms/ are locate】d in importa【nt】 strategic locations across th\/e Baltic region/.The farms are all in close co】n\t【act with \each】 other, sharing techn/iques and /ideas despite having diffe/rent\ experiences.Kieler】 Me】eresfarm f】ounder Tim Sr【a\ufenberge/r \says '】'I'm having【 here diffe【rent【 conditions th【\an in Sweden. So w/ha【t 】works for me doesn't really wo】rk in】 Swed\en and/ vi/ce versa b\ut we 【can talk\ to each other and have that \shari【ng of i/deas.''T【he wate】\r quality and transparency is mea】sured twice a year and researc\h】ers sa】y that the results ar【e conclusive.1212121212121212More than/】 just mu【ssels\NGO Coas\【tal Union Germany, EUCC, is 】als】o helping to raise soci】al awa/ren/ess on imp/ro\ving water qual】ity.EUCC has cre【at【e】d a number of databases and learning tools for intern【a】tional networ】ks, providing\ relevant i】】nform【/at【ion, wo】rkshops /and 】conferenc\es about/ the im/porta/nce /of usin】g】 musse/【ls to impro】v/e wa】te/r qualit/【y i/n \the Baltic Sea.Looking to the futureThe project's ultima】te aim is \to bring r【eal change to the【 Baltic Sea region.This i】\s 【expected to be done in revolutionis/ing\ the us】e o/f /musse/】l meal for ani【mal feed. The【 project is expe【】cted to also at\tract int/erest from broader \markets,/ at/tracting /entrepreneur/s /and in\vestment in mussel m\eal as a viable alternative to curre【nt\ animal feed.Watch s】ome of【 ou【r social media coverageShare this】 ar】t【icleC\opy/】paste the ar\//ticle video em【be\】d link below:Cop】y【\ShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareS【end/ShareShareYo】u mi/ght also like/ / \ / 【 Devise【 P【roject: Ireland puts the spotli\ght on digital/ SMEs / \ / 【 More aboutContamination of waterEn【vironmental 】protecti】/\onF/aun】a and F【loraGermany Browse today'\;s tagslnYI

sSLyText sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from life9ZYR

lJqpText s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellnessKmsgpm04

rrdQCould jel/ly【fish be th/e answer t】o fighti【ng ocean pollution?Pira

wqJEGree【n festival: partying conscio/】usl【y at Sziget Festivali4cI

4b9GText sizeAaA【aIt /may be quite some time /until t/he fast-fashion industry c【o/\m/ple【te】ly slow/s 】do/wn, but wit【h new trends\ being set in motion, 【/th/ere is now hope /t】hat 'slow fashi】o】n'】 i\s a【 trend gat/hering trac】tion.T/he demand for 'cool',/ affordable】 clothing/ is h\ard 【to keep up with, with clothes bei】ng/ d【el【】ivered /in bulk i\nt】o highstreet shops\ t\o try 【and match ret/ail expectation/s. But more often than\ not/, they come with a high en】vironment\al pri\ce tag in t/he long term;/ the f/】ashion indus】try\ is the second bigg【est polluter in the 【worl【d, o\nly second to oi/l.A glo【b】al movement called Fashion R】evolut/ion /who are campaign】ing for sustain】a\bility and greater transparency in th\e fashion【 supply chain, have just released their latest report. Known 【】as【 the Fashio\n \Tr\ansparency In】dex, the repo\rt 】scores over 20】0 major【 global【 brands on how su【stainable their manufacturin//g pro/ces/s /is. /As pr】edi】cted, the a\verage score 】is only 21%, indicat】ing that there 【is s\til/l】 a considerable way to go in improving w【or/king c【onditions, hum【an rights and d【ecreasin/g the\ environmental impact of production.\ This rele/ase of /fi】gures c【oincides with the 】s/ixth】 anni/versary of the devastating Rana /】Plaza garment factory collapse 【\in Banglades\h, where /more tha/n /1000\ workers d】ied and aro\und 2,5"By\ d/oing good, good came【 back t】o me"/; we/re injur】ed. The tragic factory disaster was】 the first 】to really t/rig【ger alarm \bells on a g/lo】ba】l scale, rais/ing awareness about the deadly co【st of fast】】 fashion and th】e frankly inhumane working【】 conditions【/ in 【garment factories. \ C\lick on】 th【e video above to see learn mo\/【re abo】ut this report.S【hare this article More from st【yleKQV4

/Join us in t\his i\mmersive 36/0° experience onboard "/B】roodw/inner" - a /29 metre bea/m trawler built// in【 1967 a/nd used to train/ you】ng fisherme【n in Belgium.The vessel, renova【\ted a 【f【ew years ago with the supp】ort of the Euro】pea/n 】Maritime and 【Fis/heries F/und, has everything necessary to p】/rovide fut/ure maritime professiona【l】s\ with ha/】nds-on ex】perience./B】art De Waegenare, a te【acher a\t the Maritie【m Instituut Merca/tor in 【Ostend, \superv\is\es a】 group of l】o\】cal students on/ their training trip."T/he】【y】 come f/rom everywh】】ere in Belgium. /They start at 12-13 years of age, and they sta/y u/ntil 18."The f\irst and the second year clas【ses 【go to】 sea /ev】ery】 \n\ow 【and【 then, but the th】ird and /fourth】 year students go out e/very two week】\/s with t】he vessel — eve【r【y tw【o wee/ks for 【a whole s\chool year."That’s normal\ working hours, between 080/0 and 1600 &m\dash; so/ fo\r 】eight hours a day/, t\hey are at /sea."We /try to t/each them /to be a fis/herma】n — fr】om t\he begi\nning. What is a fis【hing boat, what d】o you/ have to do,/ it’s normal working cond【iti【ons f【/【or a beam trawler【."We teach them t\o work safe\ly】 【— safet\y he】lmet, saf【ety】 device for 】when/ 【they fal】l overboard — that&rsquo】;s never happened, but【 you never know【. So that&r/squo;s also an importan\t part. Working w【ith fish /— 【they have to clean the 【\fish, things 】lik【e that. And /naviga】ting th/e/ vessel also."They really see what it is\, getting their first impression \her\e.\ A/nd then when they get older, they g】et technical cl】a/sses, and t】he older g】u】【\】/ys /\h\ere go to sea on professional fishing vessel\s. There they see real life at a workplace. A】nd that,\ in \my opi\nion\, i\s when they /make/ a choice to do \it — o】r not to d\o it."Journalist name • Denis】 LoctierSh\are this articl【eShareTweetSharesend】/ShareTweetShar【esendMoreHide/ShareSendShareShareSha【reSendSh/areShare\More \aboutOceanFisheryEnvironmental protectionYouth360° vid\eo 】 【 【】 Most viewed / \ /What influence on clim/a【te/ is th\e coronavirus lockdown really having? / 【 / T\【he new AI system 【safeguarding pre/mature babies from infec\tion / \ \ 】 【 / 】 Messenger R\NA:【 \the molecule\ that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 】 / Apple and Google\ say they'll wo/rk toget【her t】o trace spread of coronavirus via smartphon】es \ 【 【 】 \ How EU funding is \chan\ging th【e fac【e of L\a/】tvian\ innovat】ion 【 / \ 【 Browse today's t/【ag/s

cnBrT【ext size】AaAaW】ith a p【icnic packed sa//fe\ly in my bag, awa【y from the enquiring noses of the many dogs I me/t along 【the route, I\ set off ac【ross Far\thing Downs and Happy\ V】alley to \explore the South L/ondon Dow/ns with the promise of a pub at th/e end o/f my 4 km wa【\lk. Almost immediately, I【 had to 【ste】p aside for a/ ra\pidly approaching horse 】and rider as they scrambled up 】the \cha\lk【 emba【nkment. Spr\awlin\g/ vie\ws of forest】s\ and sheep-dot/【ted fields were my reward as I /completed the short walk from Coulsdon S\outh St【ation up/h\ill\ to r【each \th【e top of /Farthing Downs. There is n\o doubt you are still within Gr/eater L】ondon; the rigid archite/ctu/ral figures of the City are a /jarring sigh\t amo\ngst the soft hills that frame /\them. 】It doesn’t feel like it, though, as yo/u de\scend into th】e valley and the nature\ reser【ve/ be/gins to envelop you in its lu【sh remoteness.Takin\g a break in Devilsden Woods&c】【/opy; Helene Je【unet/Eurone/wsWhilst in the process of pla/nning my walk I had discover///ed that this co/llection o】f parks is made up of 】multiple】 S\ites of Spe】cial Sci\】entific In】\tere/st (SSSIs), ext/【remely rare/ 【chalk g\rasslands that can/ be as diverse in species as a r【ainforest. The London Wild】life\ Trust st【ates that, thanks to changes in land use, an estimated 80%】 of th/is habitat has been lost in the/ last 60 ye【ar/s.On the hottest da【y of 2019 so far and just a week befo\re my vi】sit, \a s【peci】al ceremony we\lco【me】d this collecti【on o】f green spaces into London&\rsquo;s col】le】c】tion】 】of NNRs. This【 417-hectar\e area【 is teemi】ng with an a】stonishing quant】ity of species; Natural England's 【Adam Wal/lace/ said at the event that【 "there are/ o/ver 40 species p\e\r\ s】quar【e metre of p【lants that exist on/ this sort of site and/ th【at supports a huge range \【of wildlife."In a】 press release, Nat/ural England highlights that th\is will be Lo\ndon's t\hird reserve, the second lar\gest after Richmon【d Park. \Its】 n\ew sta【tus as an 】NNR helps to 【pre/s\erve o\pportunities for t【h/e /385,0【】00/ res】ide\nts of Croydon to have contact with nature/ and connect on a 【more persona【l level wi】】th a 】wild\er side of Lond\on.It&【rsquo;s not only the/ res【id】en/ts of C/roydon, however, 】tha\t【 will benefit from the protection of th】is【 outdoor sp】a】ce. Just a 30 minute trai【n【\ ride /from Victoria Stat【ion, it al【so】 offers an easy escape\ from t\h\/e stuffiness of Central London.Rel【ated 】| Et/hiopi/a breaks W【orld Record by planting 350 million trees 】in one dayPicnic in Happy Va\lley&c】/opy; Helen J】eunet/EuronewsI sat down to enjoy my picnic on a benc/h surro】unded by this ra】re gra\【ssland, overlooking Happy Valley. On th\e way throug/h【\ /Coulsd】on, I had stopp】ed to see i/f I could find some b\o】ok】s to help with iden/t【ifying 【th】/e 【c\arpet o【f flowers tha】t now \e\n】vel/oped】【 \me and was rewarded with/ some vintage ch\ar【ity sho\p finds. /They ma】\y n/ot have been the most up-to-date/ guides【 but their gorgeous illustrati【ons were almost as captivating】 as the real th】【【ing\. T】he o【ld books【 ca\m【e with the adde/d 【bonus \that, once I was done with 】them, they 】could be donat\ed back to the shop for anot】her explo/rer to enjoy withou】t the waste of buying new.【Secondhand bo】o】\ks including flo【/wer an\d t】r/e】e identifi\cat/ion guides&co\py; Helene \Jeu】net/Eu】ronew/sEven in the middle of a weekday afte/rno\on】, I found people enjoyi\ng 】the reserve \at】 e/very po】int /in my wa/lk. /As I was \t】aking photographs, /one man p【asse\d com\ment /to a couple sat wi//th him, &ldqu】o;ar【en’t】 you/ goin/g to take any to/urist pictures?” It /transpir】\ed that th】ey w/ere visi/ting f\/rom 】Spain, and he】【 ha】d b\【rought them out/ to experience the re【markable pla/ce /in which he li\ved.】More tourists, this time【 an Italian family, s】top】ped to a/llow me to take their pic】t】ure a【s they【 cycled through th\e par\k. On the gras/s a l/ittle【 way ahead/ lay a c】hildren&r】squo;s activi/ty book wi\t//】h the scribbli【ngs of【 an e\/ager insect enthusia/st cove\r\ing 】the pag】e,\ its】 owner 】de\【eply engrossed in the【 identification o【f an uncooperative butterfly several me】tres away【. Outs】i/de of】 your】 usual wal【k\ing】 and】 cycling】 routes, Friends of Farthing Downs lists a considerable number of bridleways/ around thi/s area/ e】ncompassing 】a range of \difficulti/es that offer alt\ernative views o【f the reserve for the keen \equestrian.】Identify flowers amo\ng【 t【he vast wildflower meadows&【cop/y; Helene Jeunet/Euronew】sI/t is th【is /\kind of engag\eme\nt with the env\】iron\ment that Cro//ydon Council, the City/ of【 London C/\orporation and Natural Eng【lan【/d hope will encou【rag】e the 【local p\opu】lation, and t\hose from further afiel【d, to h\e\lp keep this vital natural resource intact. Nature re/】cov】ery is beneficia【l to improving na/tional health \b/ut also as a pot】ential defence against th\e future\ effects of c【limate \chang】e, ac】cording to Tony Juniper head of N】atural England.】Views 【across Happy Valley chalk g/r】asslands&co\p\】y; Helene Jeunet/Euron【ewsR【el\ated | "Love Water" c【a】mpaign t【o enc】ourage Britons to look aft【er /waterwaysCresting another hill, the encroaching 】housing estates signalled that I wa/s 】nearing the end/ of my w\alk. 】In a field just bef\ore the path came 【t/o an e【nd,\ I foun\d volun】teers in the process of h【elpi【ng to r【/estore plant 【【life after years of ove【rgrazing by sheep and \rabbits. I s\】at \and watch】ed /them for a\ while, 【considering how this change in【 status affected the real\ity of the local area’s role f/or】 the community. Turning/ the South L/ondon Downs i【nt】o\ an NNR doesn&r/squ/o;t n/e/cessarily cha【nge an awful lo/t about 【experiences of the area; i【t d【oes】n't add any 】flashy visitor centres o【r adventure playgro【und】\s. What it offers most practically is/ greater, mor】e【 cohesive protection\【 for the fl【ora and\】 f【auna that make it so /unique. In t\urn,【 protected green sp【aces offer chances for 【improved mental and physic【al health in【 local population】s. But what \else?Woodland path/ways of m\any different kinds&/copy\; 】Helen【e 】Jeunet/EuronewsInclusion of another loca/lly import】ant green space int】o the \grou【p of【 2【2 NNR\s that 【e/xist 【\across the\ UK rea/\l【ly se】emed important /as I watched the volunteers. At the ev/ent\ that /declared its new status, Int】erim Chief Execut【ive of Nat/ural E【【ngland【,【 Marian Spain called the ar\ea 'part of【 /a national set of jewels】 i【n】 \the\ c【rown.'N】NRs are \managed by Natural England on beh】alf o/f\ the】 nation, often /by vo\lunteers like those I saw, for the benefit of the】 public.】 They】\ are for all o\f us/ 【【to e\njoy, to bring our】se【lves per/\sonally closer to n【ature an/d perhaps to】 better appreci/ate【【 t【he diverse magnifi/cen】ce【 of /the e/nvironment. It offers /re/】al, material proo\f of\ posit/ive【 environmental impact by hu/mans, pro/【of that we can 【effectively look a【fter the world we live 【in if\ we approach it in small chunks. In the face \of increasi\ngl【y negativ/e n/ews surr/oundi\】ng the climate crisis, t【he 】pr\e【se\r\vation o/f these na\tio\nal】ly im【p】or\/ta/nt 】plac/es】 【】/off【ers a sense of hope. It is an advert fo】r collec【tive action; if /we all 【w【o】rk together/【, things can change for the better.A well】 earned dri】nk【 at The Fox pu】b&co\py;\【 Helene Jeunet【/Euro】newsWi\th a/ happy glow that only a few hours spent outside can bring, 【I rounded】 the f】inal corner to the end of my a\dventu\re, The Fox,【 an 18th century\ 】v\illage pub very m【uch\ a【t home in【 the\ picturesque rural surroundings】 that had so 【absorbed me for th\e la\st【 4 km\. T\he p】ub was anyt\hi】ng but Vic\torian \in its offerings【【 with a vegan menu 】available, something I took full advan【tage of and ordered a dairy\ free\ d\esert to /coo/l【 \me d\own. I retired to the gent】le sun \of t/he busy】 g\/ar【den【, cold drink and coconut ice cream 】in hand, fee/ling tired but】【 satisfied with my Frid\ay【 afternoo\n escape 【from the city.Share this article 】 More from p【laceszcLH

tP8iText sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000EU&#/039;s youngest commissioner\ on\ how to turn【 clim【ate cri【sis arou】nd twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ifeXQju

gSYpText si】zeA】【aAaCan a univ\ersity&r【squo;s campus building promote【】\ sustainabi】lity and care \for the environment while also bei【n】g an architect\ur】al】】 marvel? /Budapest/’s Central Eur】opean U\ni\versity (\】C\E【U)【 proves that the l/ec/ture hall\s in which we /study ref】lect ou/r【 acknowledgement of the【 seriousness of climate change, p【/ut \us on a path towards alle\viating carb/on emissions and wast【e, and enrich 】our concept of aesthetic bea【\u】ty.I【/n July, 2015 CEU【 became【 the second highe【r educatio\n insti【tution in contin【enta/l Eur【ope, and the first \in Central and Easter】n Europe, to receive the BRE【EAM 【(Bu【ilding 】Research Establ【ish】ment Environmental As【sessme\nt Method) certificatio【n, th/e world's le】ading design a/nd /a】ssessment method for sustainable buil\di\ng】s.Two 】of【 \the【 campus&//rsquo; buildings – the Nador 15 a】n】d\ the Nador 13 &n\dash; have been BREEA/M certified. 】In\ 20//1【7, th】ese bui/ldings won the CEU \/the Env】ironmental S【ocial an\d Sust\ainability 【A\ward, part of the CIJ Awar/ds Hun【gary competition spons】ored 【by CIJ, Europe’s 】l\//ea【ding【 Real Estate digital and pri/nt news provi【d】er.The n【】ew and 】imp】roved/ bu【il\dings boast features s】/uch as micro-shading, high f/requency lighti】\ng a//nd n/atural li\ght, cover】ed /courty/ards, preserved b\rick work /a/s cons\truction mater\ial, bio\diversity an/d open\ air spaces on camp】us and motion, air quality and temperatu\re data collection with build\ing management software, among o【the/rs.Insi\de the N15 buildi\ngCEU/Daniel VegelCEU's ro\oftop gardenC/EU/Da】niel VegelWe】 too【k a tour】 o/f t】he stunning N13 and 【N15 bu\ildings with Tamara Steger (Associ】ate Pr】ofessor in CEU’s】 Environmental Sciences】】 Department\【 and the Chair of 】the /Su【sta】inability Committee a】t \the time)\ and Loga【n Strencho】】ck (CEU’s/ MSc En】viron\mental Scie【nces【, /Poli【cy and Management a/】lumnus 【and cu【rrent Enviro】nmental and Su//stainability Officer), both of whom were inv【olved in t\he project from \day one.Why B\REEAM?/Logan: “We could have【【 chosen from a few 】different susta/inabilit】】y【 stan】d】a【rds such as LEE\D, the/ Danish b】uildi】ng codes or t【he /German Energ\y Conservation Regulation】s but we】/ dec/i】d】【ed to 】pur【\sue BREEA【M b/ecause we】 a/re in a】n u】rban campus 【[CEU’s campus is【 in the heart 】of historic Pest】] and we have a mix of old\ and new buildings, so 【that was the mos【t suitable for us.&rdq】uo; View this\ po/st on Instagram/Dear n\ew CEU /Class, welcome to 【#【Budapest! Thi/s what th】e #walktoschool will lo\ok like f/or many of you. Hope you'll enjoy your time with us! #WelcometoCEUA p】ost \shar/ed b/y Cent【ra/l European Univer【si/ty 】(@ceuhungary) on Se】p 3, 2018 at 4:21am PDTCEU in\ historic PestTamara: &l\dquo;While there was in】terest in support【ing green building fea\tu】res\, BR【EEAM certi【fication\ 】was/ not a given at first. C/EU considered th\e eviden【ce and 【was convinced of the i】mportance 【and value of h/aving ce\rtific】ation/\ 】to reflect t】he rigor【\ i//n its commitment to sustainability /a】nd its prom\inent 】r】ole\/】 in academic excel】/【lence as well./ T\he\ certif/ication was also an importa】n\t ga】uge that co】uld assure the edu/cational, environmental and econ\】omi/\c benefi\ts based/ on specif/ic and reputable\ standar\ds 【and criteria. By \pursuing BREEAM, the\ administration】 saw the opp\ortunities to 【【save money, demons/【trate furthe】r /their/ commitment to sustainabilit】y, and eve】ntually take advantage of the important learn/ing opportunities manifested in\ th/】e building\s' des【ign a/nd operations】.&rdquo\;Th/e path to /BRE】EAMLogan: &ldquo/;In\ 2009, the university signed a 【susta/inable development p\olicy bu【t without the tools to do anything, i【t was mostl/y a nicely worded do\cum】ent. So when in 2012-2013, the univ/ersity decided to kick off a redevelopment project it was decided t【hat i】t wa【s in everyone&r\squ【】【o;s inte】rest to d\esi\gn an effic/ie/n】t building. In order 【/to achi/eve th\is, the university nee\ded a team /to work on th/i/s full/ time and so 【the S\ustainab】ility Officer position /was /created. The firs【【t item on 】my a【genda w/as to 【persuade the administra【tion t\o pursue/ BR【EEAM because i【t \【would show that】 we/’re t/aking step\s outside of ‘business as\ usu】al&r【squo; /and taking sus\tainability seriously】. We\ knew it would c【ome with a lot 【of extra costs and effort b【ut we】 w/a】n【ted to do it right.&\rdquo;Tama\ra:/ “In term/s of【 the environmental i【mpacts, the campus 【before was not【 as 】energy an【d water efficient; acc\ess to r//ecyc\ling b】ins 【and fil】tered water was limited; and the Ja【panese Garden was /not as ecologically friendly a】s the N15 rooftop. 】The redeve【l】o【/p【ment effort n】ot only drew on【 general e/nvironmental and economic con】cerns, b/ut d【emonstrated CEU's commitme】nt to sustain\abili\ty education/ as sig】nato\】ry to the Copernicus Charter and its Sustaina/ble Dev\elopment】 Po\licy.&\rdq\uo;CEU's rooftop \garde】nCE】\U/【Danie【l VegelLogan: “At t\h【e time, there were a few contrac/tors here in Budapest who were famil/iar with BRE and LEED because a few b【anks and private c\ompanies had \already b\een certif】ied in Hung】ary. But our pr】】o\ject was especiall【y【 complex b【【ecau\se we are in the heart o】f th【e 5th distr【ict【, in a historically significant build\ing and we ha//d to take/ d/own one /building entirely on【 a 【very small const】/r【uction foo】t\prin】t, all while keeping 【the university r【u】nning full 【time. \Ge】t\ting the BREEA\【M certification \takes a\ long time and requires a lot【 of \documenta】t】ion, which can get quite complicated be/cause the】 inspectio】n is \very【 rigorous a【】nd thorough &/n/dash; as】 it\ s【hould be, of c【】ourse. But/ we\ knew this whe【n we d【eci【ded to embark on th\is redev【elo【pment proj/ect.&r】dquo;The new, im\proved and BREEAM】/-certifi/ed CEU campusTamara: &】ldquo;The new\ BREEAM certified buildings reflec】t CEU's o】wn charac/ter as an i【nnovative, visi】onar/y place of learn【/ing and research wi】th concrete (l【ite【\rally and f/iguratively!) im\pact【. In addit/ion to th】e】 direct green benefits, the new campus buildi】ngs /also nurt【\ured the CEU community in 】a different way /in terms of learning and learning experiences, c【\ommunity inter】actions and teaching. The CEU community is incr】easingly aw【are/ of recycl】ing d\ue to th/e p/resence o\f recycling bins.Recognition and awards for the N13 【and N15 buildi\ngs, including/ thei【r environ/mental features, ha\ve been well publicize\d 】drawing attention to the beauty and /impor\tance of environmental 】sustainabilit】y. The bu/i【ldings reflect ou/】r acknowledgement of the seriousness o】f climate chan/g【e\ and pra【ct【i/cal steps in \the【 【/direction\ 【of alleviating c】arbon emi【ssion【s and waste.【”I\nside the N15 buildingCEU///Zolt/a\n Tub】aLogan: “W【as it \all w【orth it? 】Yes! BREEAM guided the b】uilding design and【\ the c】onstruction m\an\agement process to be comprehensive with concern for long-term functio【nality, sustainability a\nd the environm】ent.&rd\quo;Ta】mara: &l\d【quo;One/ of the \features of t【he new buildings/ that 【I really like ar【e 【the old b\ricks that were reuse\d from the previous buildi【ng. The library a\nd classro】om\s have facilitated new possibilit/ies for st/【udying/, learn【\in【g, networking and】 teaching\ such as priva】te meetin\g rooms 【in /the】 library and s】\mart b】\oard【s/ in the c【las\sr【ooms. /Since being loca/ted in N13, I run i【nto colleagues from different\ depart\ments much 【more fr/equen【tly a【nd enjoy the opportunities to catch up \on news, resea\rch oppo\rtunitie】s, et】c.【”CEU's re-used brickwor\kCEU/Zoltan Tuba】Logan:】 “\What is【 truly uni】que ab/out】 the new ca】mpus is the roof garden. I【 haven’t se【en an【y /othe\r central】ly【 【【locat/ed u\niversity building with s\uch 【a space. The way /that th\e N13 】buil\d\ing wa】s la】rg\ely preserved but reinvented/ is also an ac\/hie/vem】ent in and of itself. We\ re\used a lo\t of bri】ck-work【 from the buil\ding th/at was /t/aken down 】as opposed to 】【using fresh con/structi】on material, which 【】/has a significant en】vironment\al impact reductio【n. Arch【itecture-wise】, I find the lib/ra】ry 【【to be a real/ly n【ice space not /only for r\ead\ing【 and studying, but\ also 【f/o【r 【rela/xing \thanks t\o \the lay out and the nat\ural ligh【t that \manages to penetr\ate 【and t【he stunning city views you get from some of the li/【brary’s /windows.Wha】t I hope the redev\elopmen\/t project and th\e BREE/A】M cer【tification reall【y ac】hiev【e is teaching /】\people how to r\eally have an impact wit】h\ their research. You’re not done once the bu/ilding】 is/ built. We have an/ environme】ntal sciences department here at CEU which activ】el\y engages with environment【al so【cial\ mov\ements in Bud/ape【st, Hungary&\rsq/uo;s r】egions and the Centr/al Euro/pea\n region as a wh【ole【. I hope】 this new buil【dings further motivates th\e/ p\rofess//ors and\】 th】e\ student com\muni】ty t】o have【 a \real/ impac/t with 】their resear/ch.&r【dquo; View t【his post on InstagramSpri\/ng 】is here! Check o/ut \the Li\br】ary’s view/ onto /one of CE】U’s newly】-planted vertical gardens! It&rs/quo;s #takeoverTuesday with the #【C\EULi\/b\rary】.【 #sp/ottedatCEU #v\erticalgardening #springA pos/t shared by Central Eu】ropean Uni\versity (@ceuhun】gary) on Mar 21/, 2017 a\t 2:26a\m P/D【TCEU【\ Libr/aryAlthou【【gh at pre【\sent there is st【il【l some uncertainty 【r\eg/ar\ding CEU’s s【/tatus in Hungary due to long-running political\ tensions, \the university ret【ain\】s accreditation as a Hu】【ngarian university and will seek to c/ontinue teaching \and research activi\ty in Budapest as long as】 poss【i\ble.Share this article More/ from lifexbXS

c78NThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagsx3r0

HTHh\British sculptor Emily Young 】has created a【n entire "submar【ine" exhibit】ion in Tuscany】\.【The exhibitio\n is made for scuba 】d\ivers to enjo【y but \also serv\es】 a/nother purpose.The sea off T】alamone has not been exe【mp】t fro】m t\he /illegal trawl【/【ing【 which has r】avaged Europe's wate】rs. Fisherm】en h】ave been pla\cing large sto\ne blo\cks underwater to/ obstruct th/e trawler】s' nets for s/ome years.Artis/t Emily Y【oun\g was inspired by this id\ea【 /and decided【 to j\oin the【 fishermen's/' ef】forts. Young's C】/a【rrara】 Marble structures a\re eight met【res below the s\ea and c【ontribut】\e to conser【ving the area's unde】rwater ecos【ystem.W【an\t more news】?Video editor【 • /Nathalie Te/x\i】erShare this articleCopy/pas/te the article v【id【eo embed 【link below:CopyShareTweet【Shares】endShareTweetSh】aresendMoreH【ide【ShareSendSh/areShareShareSendShareShareYou m/ight also lik/e \【 【/ \ Watch: C】ontempo\rary sculptures fill th】e T\ate with movement 【 / 】 】 Watch【: Street /【opera in Italy \cha/l\lenges stere【otypes 【 \ 【 】 Foundation promotes su】stainable foo/d /produc\tion \ \More 】ab【out20-second/sEnvi】ronmental \protectio\nItalyScul】ptu【reA】rt 】 Browse tod】ay&\#039;s tagsV2Pp

sxyqCreating music f【rom garbageo7Au

08AOMore than 】160 \people kil/led for d】\efendi/ng the environment:【 campai】gn/ group98GC

fpz3Scientists in【 J\or/dan have discov【ered that corals \in the 【Gulf of Aqab【a are\ resisting the rise \in】 water tempe/ratures.Across the\ w/orld/, coral reefs are【 dying at rapid rates due\ to overfis\hing, pol【lution an/d climate ch】ange.It&rsq/uo;s est/i/mated that\ half the of earth\’s r【/eefs have been lost.This figure is thought to be critical, considering that corals are the habita\t of /one in fou【r 【of all marine species.【/Furthermore, up to half of the w/orld&rs【q【u/o;s oxygen co【mes】 fro【m t【\he oceans and the cor\a【l r\eefs wi/【thin.The exact/ reason /for the corals’ resilience in Jordan is s【till unknown, but some analys\t/s b【eli【eve tha\t t/he creatures【 evolved d/ur\ing/ the \last ice age of more tha【n 20,000 years ago.Samp/le/s of c/or/als in Jor/dan used for【 analy/sis】Doctor Fuad Al【\-Horani, professor of coral 【bi】ology and ecology at the //University of\ Jordan, ho\pes that the marine】 inverteb】ra】tes【 【may one-day be the ke】\y to re-pop/ulating th】e world’s\ dyi】ng reefs.“There are tech【niques -/ we can propagate corals," he says. "We can climatise them to c/on/ditions available to them in t【he other 】seas. So, o/nce we grow 】them, w】e can send them abroad where/ they【 ca【n grow them into 】dete【riorated areas or damaged 】r】eef areas./&rd】quo】;Doctor Al Hor/ani wor/ki/ng on c【orals in JordanTOURISM & EC【ONOMIC DEVELOPMENT\ STIL/L J\EOPARDISE AQABA RE【\EFSSpanni】ng【 a distance of 2】7 kilom】etres,/ the s/l/ither】 o\f coastland】 calle】d Aqab/a【 is/ Jordan&/rsq\uo;s only sea-outlet.Despite glimm\ers of hope, the port【\ city&/rsq\uo;s coral remains\ in dange/r, wit】h glo【bal dev【elopment and pollution threatening its surv】ival.Jordan&r】squo;s【 coastland and 】only portTo enc\ourage【 economic】 d【ev/e【lop】ment, whi/lst p\rotecting the re\【efs, i/s therefore a con/【stant c/】hallenge f/or the Jordanian authorities.】Aqaba\ is a major tourism hub which we【lcomed around 100,000 v\isito\rs last year. D/ue to t/he sector&rsqu【o;s expansion, Jordan&rsquo】;/s only 【port 【w】as/ re【locat/ed to】 the si/te 【of one of Aqa/ba&r/squo】】;s lar【gest reefs in 2006/.The governmen【t, w/ith \th/e help of the United Natio/ns, worked to save a portion of t【he t/housand-year-old 【【reef【 by r】/elocatin【g\ t【he coral two miles f】】urther \【alo/ng the coastline】.Co【ral r/eefs in Jo\rdan being r/\eloc/【\atedAccord/ing to Neda/l Al Ouran, He/ad of】 \th/e Environment【, Climat\e Change and Disaster Risk Reduc\tion of th】e United Nations Development/ Programme, /the/ replantation far】ed mu/ch better than \expec【】ted.&】ldquo;We had great】 success,” he says. &ldquo【;Lucki】ly, we got】 a grow】th【 ra/te\ of more \t【han 85 per cen\t,】 w】hich is unique.\ Globally, you would fin\d 【the average growth rat\e af【】ter tra/nspl】antation and translocation would 】be 65\】.”Eco-dive\rs in the region l】ike Abdullah Al Momany, howe/ver【, believe that much more still/ n】】eeds to be done.He is fearful that the relentless rate o】f progress and de】velopme】nt is thre【at【ening to compro】mise the re】al draw of the area/, the re/efs.&ldqu】o/;Here in Aqaba, our \big/gest pr\oblem is us affec/ting【 the marine【 environment as humans,&rd\quo; he says. &ldquo\;I think the government need/s to enforce the law, do more awar【enes\s program【m】【es, and/ do m/ore effort/ in /protect】ing the marine life.&rdqu/o;Share this arti】cleCopy/paste th】e ar/tic【l【】】e video embed lin】k【\ below:CopyShareTweetS【haresendSh/ar【eTwee/tSharesendM【oreHid\eSh/areSendShareSh【\ar【eShareSendShareShareYou m\i/ght【/ also lik】e \ \ 【 /Rain, flood【s and confused se\als: Inside/ An】\tarcti】ca's warmest-ever summ/e】r 】 \ / \ 】 / C】limate migrants: How even\ rich Bavaria ca/nnot provide sh】elter from glo/bal warm】in\g 】 【【 / 】 【 】 Living i【n \a ghos\【t town: Mee/t the Moldovans w/ho refus\e t】o b】e climate m【igra【nts 】 【 M\ore abou】tGlobal warmi/ng and /climate changeEnvironmental pr/otectionEcologySeaJordanHot TopicLearn more about \ Global 【warmin【g an\d climate change Hot TopicLear\n/ mo】r】】e about Global warming and clima【】te change / Browse today's【 tagsIHT0

AB76Text sizeAaAaWalking】 along the shore of the Dead Sea give【\【s you a c\lear vision of how 【qui\/ckly【 na/ture \reacts to】 human intervention. The\ Dead S/ea h/as been dying for de\cades,\ and】 the result is \al/ready obv】ious.Nestled betwee】n Israel and the Palestinian T【erritories 】and /Jordan, /the Dead Sea has been le\aving its mark /【【on mankind since biblical times. Famous for its extreme sa】】linity, /an/ Israeli a】r/tist 【has even】 been i【nsp【ired by that and use t/he\ expanse as【 her stu】dio\ to create cry/stal art pi\eces.Since the histori【cal lake has be【en exploited by modern indus】try, the【 wate【r】 】level is【 g】radually lowering. T【he m【iner/al extraction and the diversio\n of the \Riv/er Jord【an&r\s】/quo;s/ water /have been\ big c/ontributors to the phenom】enon.】As the sp\ectacularly shrinki\ng wat\er level leaves it】s mar】k on the shore,\ d\angerous sinkholes appear al【ong the lake - the 】】result of \the br】iny wat/e\r r/ecedin/g unde【rgrou】nd. /In 199【0 th】e】re were a little 】over 100/ sinkholes, accordi\ng to the Geological/ Survey o\f Israel. Today the】re are more t/】h/an【 6,000. This led 【to the n】ecessary clo/【sure【\ of some s【hore seg【ments hence those tourist spots became ghost to】】wns.Click on th】e video above \to learn more ab】out what happens with the Dead/ S】【【ea.Share this【 article 】 More\ from plac/esdwLw

KkCYText sizeAaAaOn 】the】 one hand, one of 【the bigg\est environmen/tal issues in the European\ Uni【on\ is how to reduc//e food wast\e and t【ackling issues around water【 s【carcity across the 【supp/ly chain.In the UK alone, food/ waste is e/\stimated to have the【 【value of more than £20 bi\llion (equ\al to &e】uro;.78 billion - approximately the GD】P of Cyprus) 【a year, s\ays UK ch【ar【ity WR】】AP.On 【the【 other/ hand, textil/es acco\unt for】 a 【/quarter/ of the environmental pollution in the region.So when it come\s to\ s【ustainable clothing, foo/d can play an impor】tant role, and /the\re ar】e already some outstanding 【examples 】out there starting from an innovative natural textile made from pineapple leaf 【&\#642;bre to ma】king\ \milk fibre.Th\e latter i】s made 【from high concentrations of casein, a milk prote\in. In fact】, /the【 techn【i\q\ue is not /ne/w. \In the 】&l】squo;30s, I】talian ch【【emist and/ e【ngineer An/tonio Fer\retti came up wi【th/ the idea 【and patented it under t】he】 na\me, L/anital\. Howeve/r, \the m\arket so\on mov\ed on to cheaper/ synthetics.It【alian fashion/【 designer An/tonella Bellina dusted off this old /tech/n/ique for her new ran】ge.Cl【ick on the vid/eo and \see how /she make\s fabric out o【f milk in T【usca】ny.\Share】 this【 ar/tic【l/e / More from 【styleImtj

LTXvBio/economy matter/\sIn this episod【/e, F【u/t/uris vis】its a /bioproduct mill i】n 】Finland where scientists, manage】rs, and inv\estors trying to p/roduce sustainable produ/cts using les/s \water and 】less energy.In the last】 f】e【w 【years, the European Un\ion has invested almos\t 4 billion eu】ros in re】search /a\imed at developing】 the】 economy in su/stai【nabl】e wa/ys.The B\ioecono【my sector a/lready employs 18 mil/lion p/e/ople with an\ annual turnover of around 2 trillion euros.Tha\t's】 /a hug/e/【/ economic pot/en】tial for\ agricul\ture, forestry, fisheries, food\, and bio-energy, that rely on a myriad of bio-base\d p【roducts cu/rren/tl\y being de/v\elop】【ed and hitting the markets around the whole continent.The \pot/ential of //pulpThe &A\uml;änek/osk】i bioprodu\c/t mil】l i】n Finland】 believes that【 it is /possible to【 transform】 up to 6.5 million cubi\c meters of pulpwood\, eve【ry yea\r, without using【 a sing/le drop\ 【of /fossil fuels.240 trucks and 70 full/y【 loaded train-w【ago\ns】 feed the mill every day with birch, spru\ce, and pine./Th\/e wo\od i【s 【used to prod【uce 【pulp, which has an annual\ p/】r】\oduct/ion\ of around 1.3 million tons.And yet, no fossil 【f】uels are \used /in t\he /whol】e pro\ces【s. 】Its managers say the mil/l i\s /completely self-suffi】cient."We are producing two and a half t/\imes more energy】 than we /are using ou\/r】s/el\ves," says Camilla Wikstr/【öm//, the 】senior/ \vi【ce-president\ /o【f Metsä\ Fibre."We /have sludge, an\d from\ the sludge【\, we/ ar\e making biogas. And then 】we have the bark, f\/\rom which we/ a【re m】aking\ product-gas and also the bark is sold out for en/ergy use outside\ the mill."【\The whole system is based on 】the idea of trying to prod】uce sus【tain【able products using less wa】ter and 】/less en/ergy. And co/ming up with ideas of ho】w】】 to use pulpwo/od i】n products other than the \usual paper an\d cardboard:"We have the ongoing pr【oject of making te】xtil/es fr【om the pulp. And also /the p\oss\ibility to 】make composites to replace 】plastics," adds Ca/milla Wi/kström.In la【boratories at the m\il\l, th【e inner prope\rties of raw materials are closely monit【\ore】d. Researchers ar【e driving t/】he development\ of sustainable thr\ee-lay/er cardboards aim\ed at i/n】/novative packagi/\ng."We are/ d】eveloping our /hig】h】\-yie【ld p】ulp】s and we/ are optimizing th】e three-layer st\r【u】ctu\re and\ then we need to know t【he information of the surface layers and then the b/ulky midd/le layer," sa/ys Terhi Saar【i, C/hemist \& director of the techno【logy 【c】enter, Metsä Bo\ard. "And (the aim is) to \make enough stre\ngth and stiffne/ss for our products".The mill required an initial inve/stment\ of 1.2 bill】ion 【euros and 【managers hope tha\t innov/at/ive green products made o\ut】 of wood will 】hel】p【 pa/y o【ff that huge inves\tment."Most/ o【f the new p【roducts/ \developed over 】the last 50 years or so w【er\e based o【n oil, they are \petroch\emical product【s," says Iklas von/】/ Weymarn, CEO of M\etsä Spri/ng."But now the situation /in terms of the business envir/o/nment, including climate】/ chan/ge an/d so o\n, is chang/ing, and【 it opens up new possibiliti】es to produce these prod【ucts fr\om wood."\Bi【【odegradable bagsAnot/】her key step in reducing 】our dependency on fos\sil fuels is/ our/ capacity t/o produce mor【e and better biodegradabl/【e,【 co【mpostabl【e biopla\stics.Resear/chers 【in Novamont \in\ northern Italy are currently developing 】and te\sting】 experimental\/ technologies to create biop】la/st】ic【s 【\fr\om ingred【ients 】suc【h as corn starch【, cellulose and vegetable oi\ls as raw materials.The /manufacturing ch\a\in \is comple\x and includes \mechanical processes 【like extrusion 【and b】lowi【ng, wh】ich trans\forms th/e natural materials\ into biopla】stic 】fi//lms,【 that can late【r be used/ to produce】 /\b】iogradable shop【【ping bag【s a/nd other biod】egrada【ble and com【postable products su【ch a\s 【plat【es, gla【sses and cutlery:The process of composti【n\/g\ or biodegrading】 these plastics into something more element】al, 】like organic carbon,\ or simply 】compo】st, takes \a long ti\me and the right c/ondi\tions.\Ale【s\【sandro【 D】&a】cute;elic【io【, an industrial chem【ist a【t No【【vamont sa/ys i/t's an u】ndergro】und process: "molecules of these 【b/ioplastics become, little by little, simpler, thanks to the a/ct\ion of microorgan\isms."T【he need for mech/anical tests is】】【 als/o importa】nt as bio】plast\ic 】must off/e/r 】th【e same str//ength \a】nd re【si】lience as ord\inary pet/ro/ch【emical plastics./ But ther\e is e\ven m】\ore to it:"Bey】ond /these m【echanical t/ests, w\e can al\/so ma】ke here qualitat/ive tests," says A】le【ssandro D´e【licio.【"We】 can/, for i\nst【ance\, measure the friction rate, or all p【roper\tie\s linked t/o the permeab【ility of the biomateria/ls,【 or /i【ts optical /properties"】These/ tests are part of】 a \Europe/a【n research projec【t ai/med at rethink【ing】 the whole plastic v】alue chai\/n, in an effort to create new business model/s and to better pr/otect the en】vironment./Researc】hers meet regu/larly to\ brainstorm new /innovation/s and 【eco-de/signs using bioplastics."We don´t simply want to c\hange one】 product for ano/ther," s/ays Luigi Ca\pizz\i, head】 】of research & developmen【t at Nov/amont."This is【 not our aim. We【 want to/ develop a syst\em that can mak【e /better use of the reso【urces of the planet; cons/uming【 less of thes/e re/sources, and redistributin/】【g them in a fairer, more】 efficien【t way."Educating the consumerEurop【e pr/oduces\ ar\ound 25 m】i【llion t//ons/ of pl】astic\ waste eve【ry year. On】ly a third is re】cycled, 【the rest/ is either in】carcerated or ends up in landfills,【 s\o u/rgent so//lutions are /\】\indeed nee】ded.Action on plastics was identifie/d by the European Commission in January 2018 as a priority /in the C【ircular Economy Action Plan, to help/ Europe】an/ businesses /and consumer\s to 【use r\【esou\rces i【【n a more sust/aina【ble way\.Sap/onia/, a/ leading de\terg\ent and personal hygiene pro【ducts ma\nu/fact】ure/r in Croatia is already【 us】【ing /b/iopla【stics\】 on the interior of their deterg\en/t pa\ckaging/."We \star/ted usi【ng a certai【n ty\pe of 【bioplas【\tic produ/ct【 /】/and then simply teac】\/h our consumers tha】t/ its\ better for them an\d for the en\viro【nment," says Andrea Bozi】】\c, h\ead of education】 and information center at【 Saponi/a."So ov【e\r【 time//, we noticed【 】that they a\ccepted these types of plas\tics and product pa【ck/ag】ing, so we will simply broad\en it \to our ot【her pro\du/cts."Resea/rchers hope their work will add /to a European 】tar\get of s】ome 10/ mill/ion to\ns of recyc/【led plastic】s being\ t【【】ransformed i\nto n/ew products by 2025.A【lo/ng with research and innovation, sc\ientists/ sa\y, education will play a c】ru/】cial ro/le in me\eting tha/t objective."There are cou】n】tries\】 in Northern Europe whose plastic waste management system i\s ve\ry well im】plemented an【d deve】loped】," says Montserrat Lan/ero, an indus【trial engineer an【//d CIR】/C-PA】CK project manager."Bu\t in other countri【es, th/is management of p】lastic wa【st【e does not ev【en exis【t. A/nd【 many】 cit/izen/s don't know what the implications of this bad manageme】nt are when it 【comes】 to \】how plastics end up in t/\【he o\ceans or ent】\er o】ur f\ood chain【.""So one of ou】r main challenges i【s to understand what are th】e needs\ of each Euro\pean cou\ntr/y to be a\ble to find /as】 many ada】pte\d solutions as we \can".To und】erstand thos【e needs, researc【hers hav】e turned t】o the concept o【f "citizen scien/【ce", /inv【olving consumers associations, to understand what the social and market expe【ctations are when i/t /comes to \reinforcing th】e ci】r】cular economy in the plas】tic sector."We need to e】m/power the citizen. Beca】use often t/hey /don'】t realize t\h】at their shopping【\ decis/i/o】\n is very important /in 】movin/g the market toward】s more \sustainabl】e trend【s," says Bel&eac\/ute;n Ramos, project officer for the envi】ro/\nment【 a】/t the Spani\sh Organi\sation of Consumers and Users Consu【mers - O【CU."B/ut we\ also need to em【po/wer th】e market so it can give\ a】 wider array of c\hoices to the consumer."On【e European research pr】ojec/t studyi【ng /t【h】e possibilities/ of\ crea/ting new b【ioproducts /which we\re previou【sly mad/\e with \chemic/als or oil-based /prod/ucts is the Exil】va biorefinery in N【orway./Scientists there ar【e【 tr】ying to transfor【m trees into products for at s【ectors as diverse as the automotive industry, the adh\esive ind\us【try,/ and even cosmetics.Every year 1 millio】n cubic】 meters of Norw【egia\n spruce \are trans】formed into cel/lulose, l【ignin, bioeth【anols and ce【llulo/se【 fibers.T\hese cellulose fibers/ can be turned/ into 【bioproducts through a proc【ess known a/s 【"fibrillat/ion"."The properties that som\e of the custom】/ers are looking f】or are th\e controlled vis/cosity it off/ers, so for instance /whe【n you are paintin【\g, yo】u avoid drippi/ng 【or sagging of the\ pain\t when you are applying it to t/he wal】l," says Jarle Wikeby, a ch/emical e\ngineer at【 Ex/il\va."Or you can c【ontrol the har/de】\ning 【process within adhesives. And y\ou can also have a g【ood effe】ct by adding the/ product i【nt/o c\osmetics, or \antiwrinkle/ creams】 for instanc/e."Laborato\ry research \helps improve th【e properties of th】e product and en\hance its array of industrial applications.Sc/ientists at Borregaar\d /biorefinery wo\rk to develop hi】gh efficiency and/ robust 】products for harsh environments."We are looking at particle size or specific aggregate sizes,\" 】say【s\ K\ristin 【Weel Su\ndby\, a chemist 】at Borregaard."As yo/】u \might kno\w, we also have\ two different qual/ities, one is more fibri/llated that the other. \And we 】are also starting to】 look at more film properties. With the product, you can ma【ke films/ tha/t have very goo/d\ barrier propertie【/s, oxygen barrier\s, that give strength to the /products."The pro【duct i\s one o\f】 the 700 bas】】ed on n/atural ra/w materials】 /being develope【d the\re, which【 managers 】s/ay is a trend that should grow/ in the c\omi【ng\ years:"Our product is typic\/ally a little help【er. /So you\ on】ly need a \litt\le【 new formulation to change completely a product f\rom oil-based to water-based," says Pal Rombe】rg,/ vice-pre【sident】 of B】orregaard."So 【i/t is not really a cost issue here. 】Consumer a\wareness a\nd general public aw】areness crea\te a drive】 fo\r more sustainability and /greener product\s. And this r\e】ally motiv/ates companies 】out there【 to go d【own【 tha\】t 】road a【nd really/ sp【end on resources fo【r devel】oping new,【 better products".Th】ese better products,【 rese【archers sa】y,/ should keep【 s\tea】dil\y coming to\ the ma】rkets, as t】he \European Uni/on is planning to invest a】nother 10 billion eu】r【os in\ Bioeconomy research by 】2027.12 】 【 FUTURIS \LONG 1\ / 】】 \ 12 / \ \ 】 / / FU/【【TURIS LONG 1 / 】 \ 【 12 】 / \ /FUTURIS LONG 1 】 【 【 【 \】 \ 12 】 /】 【 / FUTURIS \L\ONG \ 【 【 12 【 / FUTURIS LON【G 1\ \ / 】 / / 【 \ 】 Share th/is ar】ticleCopy/pas\te the article video embed link\ bel\ow:CopyShar/eT/weetShare\se\ndShareTwee】tSharesendMoreH【ideShareS/endShareShareShareSendShar/eS\hareY】ou might also li】ke 【 / 】 Sar\dinian thistles play /key 】rol/e in bioplastics 】 【 【 / / Could bio-plastic 】\/be the answer to bot【tl\】e wo\es? 】 \ 【 【 More a【boutSust\ainable devel/opment【RecyclingEnvironm】ental】 protection 】 M/\ost viewed / / 【\ \ \ W【ha】】t influence on climate is the cor【onavirus lockdown really having? 【 /\ The ne\w AI【 system sa\feguar\ding\ prem\ature b\abies f/rom infecti】on / \ / \ Messenger RNA: th\e mol/ecule /th\at may tea\ch o\ur bod\ie【s to beat cancer/ \ 【 /\ / \ / 】 \Apple and Goo【gle sa/y t\he\y&\#039;ll w】ork together\ to tr\ace spread o\f coronavirus via smartphones 】 \ 】 【 How EU funding is changing】【 the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 \ // Brows【e today's tags2EX7

TxbCText si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】aceseVcF

69mAWhen art/】 is a force for goodWYWH

i8FQTe/x【t sizeAaAaA few hundred【 kilo】m【etres 】off the Pacific coast of Ch\ile there is \a 】paradise for div【ers and hikers.The Robin\son \C【rus【oe island i】s one of the three for【】ming the Juan Fern\ande\z archipelago.The islan\d chain secured \its place 】in history as/ the home o】f Alexande【r Selkirk, the\ Scottis】h s\ailor】】 】marooned there for fo/ur years and four mo/nths, a tale he later related t\o Daniel Defoe\,/ who penned his 】adv\enture \book ba】sed\ on his sto【ry.For almost【 a century, the in/habitants of R【obins\o\n Cruso】e ha】ve known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them co/nserving its【 unique wildlife, 【s/o they【 decided about /taking step/s a/s ear】ly as 1935.In 1977, the arc/hipel\ago was named a biospher】e reserve and almost a year a【go, Chile announced the creation of the enormous Juan Ferna】ndez Marine Park, one of the largest p【rotected zo【nes i/n th\e Pacific.It al【so co】nnects to【 a network 】of marine reserves in Chile total\/ling some 】【1.】3 【m】illion squa/re /kilometres】【, meaning that about 44 perce】nt of the nation's】 waters ha】ve some lev【el of\ protection against min【】ing and indust【】rial】 fishing."Until 10 years ago, C\hile was one o\f the bi】ggest o】cean exp\】loiters i\n the world, but now i\t ha【s 】changed course】 【and be【【come o】【ne of\ the leaders【 i【n o\cean cons/ervation, /with the creation of/ hug\e marine \parks which \wi\ll】 really help /fish/ s】tocks recover," said Alex \Munoz,【\ Latin Amer】i【ca dir\【ect】or of【 the/ NGO\ Nation】al Geographic Pristine Seas.C】lick 【o/n the 】video above to learn more\ abou】t h】ow these islands preserved 】their fragile ecosyste\m【.S\hare】 thi】s【 article More fro】】m placesLZZ6

1.TXRvTourism set to bl\oom in Angola’s desert regionBPT5

2.nVhsEthiopia breaks world \record /by\ plan】ting 350 mil\lion】 trees in one dayQkXw

3.JkWGTe】xt sizeAaAaIn th\e shadow of \t【he f】irst/ a】nnive】rsary of/ jo【urnalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 】murder an\d\ amid escalating tensions in neighbouring Yemen, Saudi Arabi\a has opened its /doors to tourism for 】the first time.The/ fac】t is,/ Saudi has been cut off from many West\erners until】/ no【w. A\ poor i【mage in the press, alon【\gside al】legations of human 】rights abuses have put some off the idea. /That’\s \not to mentio\n 】【【the dif【ficulties in getti\n】g a vi/sa】.Now, however/, the obstacle of the 】vis/a ha\s been /removed, after 【Saudi 【/announ/ce】d its new t】ourism scheme in Septembe\r. The new tourist v】isa【 allows visi/tors from 49 countries – includin\g 】all EU n/ations i】n 【addition 】to the US/, Canada, China, Japa【n】 and 】Rus【sia among other【s】 – t\o pay \on arrival for a 90-day tourism visa/.\ It comes at a cost of 440/ S【AR plus VAT, equivalent to £9/&eu/ro;106/【9.Saudi is turning t\\o tourism in place of oilEu\ronews / \Rachel Gr\ahamThe 】】tourism board hopes the n\e【w v【isa will make it easier for people \to\ discover the land for themselv/es. And it&rsquo【;【s fair to sa\y there /is much m】ore to/ 】discover than \many realise.Read mo\re |【An unfilt【ered【 g【uid】e to getti【ng a/round in】 Saudi A【rabiaMuch of Saudi Arabia/ /wa/s un】der【wa【ter 】mil\lions of 【years a【go, and it s】h/ows\ in the landscape wit/h r/ocks ju】tting out ac【ross th】e dese【【\rt, forming wha\t used to be shelv】【es and cor】al 【reefs. Meanw】hile, the Red Sea coast as it is now is 】\a sight simil/ar to that of the Maldives. There are more than\ /1,100 tin/y, and\ com【p】letely undevelope】d, 】【/is【\lands that】 【】are home /to w【onders【 of【 n/ature.Madein Saleh, near Al UlaEuronews / R】a【chel GrahamThe western coastline fe【ature\s 】】island】s reminiscent of the Mal/divesEuronews / Rachel【\ G】rahamBut for Westerners to unco/ver th\e s\ights and sounds of 】Sa/udi, t】】】hey&r【squo;d have to be convinced that either their negat\ive percept】ions have been ex】a//ggerated or that the country has changed. \So, how liberal【 is Sau【di Arab【ia a【】bout【 to /become in its bid 【】to e【nchant\】 /tourists? A\nd at what co/st?Crown Prince Mohammed B】in S\alman is\ 】said to be behind the drive /f/or Saudi to ditc】h【 its reliance o/【n oil,\ /an】d move tow\ards other form】s of】 in/com/e. A shining jewel of that 【plan is for Saudi Arabia/ /to/ be/come【 a hub for internatio/\nal tou\rism.Supe】r citi【esIt 【has【 experience of tourism as the site \of 【the world&rsq【uo;s\ largest/ pilgrimage si\te at Mec/ca, seeing nearly 1.9 million】 non-Saudi Musli/ms make the Hajj\ pil】grimage over /the course of just a few days la【st yea【r. But no【w, the coun\tr】y】 is gearing up\/ to position i/t【self as a \luxury destination】.It is spending hundreds of/ billio】n【s【 \on \new i/n\frastruc【ture and a trio of gig【aprojects th/ro\u【ghout\ the country to \m】ake it more appealing/ to disc\erning visitors.\ These 】audacious pl/ans include 】building Saudi Arabia’s fir】st ski slop/e ins【i\de Riyadh】&rsq\u】o;s upcoming Mall Of 【Arabi\a shop\ping 】cent/re, 】\and creating the Neom super cit【y on Saudi’s Re【d Se\a coast.What wil\l \soon b】e Neom is \cur\ren\tly part of 【an/ 800km stretch of coastline s\outh /】o【f t】he bord】er with/ Jordan. A\】s it stands,\ it /doesn’\t ye【t feature a single fiv】e】-star hotel or r/es/o】rt.M/ultiple so/urc】es \\t【old Euronews Living th\at the Saudi go】v】ern/ment】 was in “advanced talks&rdq\uo; /to allow】 alcohol in /the country, 】nea/ring\ the /stage of being “rea】dy to sign” agre】ements /permitting alco】】hol in resorts such as N【eom. Currently possessi\on of or trade in alcohol is prohibi/ted, /】leading to 【se\v】ere punishments including imprisonment fo\r those cau/g\ht flouting the rules【.Shou/ld thos【e new】 r\egu/lat】【i】o\ns com】e to fruition, bo\oze wil【l become jus】t a\ small pa/rt o】【f the attract】io】n.The gove\r/【n/ment has said it is c\omm】itted t/o maintaining S/audi&rsquo】/;【s \uniqu【e s【/el\ling point\【, which bring//s together landscapes like t\hose of the U/S’s grand canyon】, the Maldives&rsquo/;/ seas and 】ancient c】ultural attra/ctions. T/his\ 【would mean sustainable】 tou\rism manag【\ement and premium positioning, sa】/y offic【ials.Al Ul】a is set to become 'th\e world's biggest liv\ing mus】eum'Euronews /【 Rachel GrahamS】ustainability/“Once we identify an e/nvironme】nt, we pu/t a coastal management plan into place,&rd【quo; s【ays Captain 】Ahmed/【 Shaker, associate director of the Marina &【amp; Yac】ht Club at King Abdul/lah Economic Centr/e north of Jeddah.“So if we】 \find a be】/ach //w\here turt/les nest, it&】rsquo/;ll be/ of\f-limits except to very small【 n\umbers of conserv【ationist\s and eco-tourists w\ho’ll access the】m in a way that doesn’t distu【rb the wildlife. We’re e】xpecting sport fishing to becom//e a big\ part of the tourism push, and【 there i/t will b】e all about catc\h and r/elease.&rdquo】;Saudi Arabia plans to【 a/ttra\ct tour】\ists to th\【e Jedd】ah coastline for /sp/ort fi】shing \【and divingKAECAmaala is a zero carbon/ resort coming to Saudi A【r】abi\a's /west coastAmaalaShaker i/s passionate abo【ut p/reser【vin/g /\the ocean/s \surrounding hi【s home【land. “/Working】 a】s a scuba instructor in Sharm El Sh】e/ikh in th】e late 80s, I saw th/e transformatio【n a\s it became a dest/ination】 【for mass tour/ism and watched as the co】rals got so rui】ned, it wa\s h】ard】ly/ w/orth diving anymo\r\e. That’\s when 】\it b/ecame a nightlife resort instead, be【cau【se 【the n】atu【ral be/auty was gone】.”Inla\nd, a project【 named 【Amaala is ai/ming for a carbon n\eutra\l buil【d/ and final【 result. It is set to feature a 【mar】ine conservation/ \ce/ntre and state of/ the art h】ea/th facil【ities in addition to luxury, sol/a】r-powered ho/tels.R/ead more | How do you make/ 】a /】luxury tourist【 destin\ation zero carbon?T【he kind of pers【\o】n likely to /make use of these /facilities are advent】urers 】- those 【\a/ttracted by t\he culture and unknown qua】ntity t\hat makes Saudi Ar【abi【a a mysterious destination, says UK based tou\/rism co【【nsultant /Roger Goodacre.\The\ coast】al region of Tabu】k is set to b【ecome encom】passed by NeomEuronews / Rachel Graham"/Saudi 】is hardly i/n danger of be\coming a mass/ tourism destination," he says. "It's someon/e who wa【nts to explor【e【【 things they\【 haven't b\een able\ to before who will visit, and there 】will be some drawn by the/ Red Sea】 Coa\st. It's p】erhaps /【the 【last unspoiled di/ving d【estination of its kind on Ear\th."Cur【rently, he's working on a project to 】quadrupl【e the n【umber of pilgrims visiting Mecca \each year, /but sees n/o object to non-Musli\ms enj】oying\ it. "Most 】people don't let their political views】 colo\ur t】heir choi】ce of holiday destinations."/How Western】 wi\ll Saudi/ go?Tac\o Bell res\】taurants, Domino's 【pizza jo【in【ts, Dunkin' \Donu\ts coffee shops a】lr【eady \line/ the /streets【 o】f Riyadh/, provin】g the Saudi p\eople /have】 already develo\ped quite/ a taste for some Western \s\t\aple】s.Meanwhil】e/, liberalisation is well underw【/ay, according to Good】acre. "Th\e religi\ou/s police [the mutaween] d【on't have anywhere【 near as much po/w】er as they \used 【to," he】 tells 】】Euronews Living."S/ocially, it\'s consid/erably more relaxe】d now, es【pecially in Jeddah【 where you're less likel\y】 to see he/a【d 【coverings, a/nd more likely to see w】om】e/n【 driving, cycling】 a/long the prome【nades and mixing of\ sexes. I【t wou\ld all have been \unthinka】ble/ until r】ecently."Read mo/re |\Trio of \eco hotels to open/ n/ext doo/r t】o 【UN【E\SCO World Heritag】e siteThe r】e【pressive】 stat\e that 【many envision is/ open【 to further cha/nge, add】】s Ahmad A\l-Khateeb, c【ha】ir\man 【of the】 Saudi Commission for Tourism and Natio\nal Heritage.“Once you o/pen the doors, it’s ve\ry difficult【 to close \them 【once more,” he says. 】After all,【 the commission w/ant \visitors to be “surprise】d and【 delighted by the trea\【sures we hav\e to sha/re&rdq/u\o;. H】e counts among them\ “five UNESCO /World Heritage S/ites,\ a vibr/ant/ local cu】lt\ure and bre】athtaking natural beauty&\rdquo;.Ar/chi【tecture in t/he capital is 【thor/oughly mod【ern\/Amr AlMadani, CEO of /the【 Royal Com\missi/on fo【r AlUla, stresses that you h【ave to have 【li【v/\ed in Saudi Arabia long e\nough to see t/he change, but po】【ints \to lifting the【 】ban on【 w【omen driving l/ast year as a pivot】al moment.Now, he wan//ts 】to mak/e AlUla - \which form\ed t】he s/o/uth\er【n h/ub \of the ancient\ Nabatean civilisation - t【he “large【st living mu】seum in the world&【rdquo;. Opening to tourism for th【em【 means revealing【 a place th\【/at connects humans, culture and 】nature."We think of AlUla as \Petra plus," he sa/ys, referring to the】 Nab/atean c\api】tal region in Jord/an 【that has become a hub f】or hist【\ory b/uffs and tourists.And 【\th【e question of the coveri\ng u/p? It is per】】haps /one of\ th【e first images【 conjured for man】y when think of Saudi Ar【abia. However wearing the \abaya isn't manda\tory for f\oreign【 visitors【, says AlMadani. "But the type of tourist we're exp】ect/ing to attract is respectful of the cul】】/ture.&rd\quo;Ultimately, \opening the floodgates to tourism wh\ile maint【】ai【ni】ng/ respect 】for Saudi&r\squo;s cul/tural heritage and natu【ral env【ironment may be to】ugh. But it is the challenge its government ha【s chos/en. With their confidence 【bol\stered by the pre\mium p/rice po【int an/d curren】t【 dear【th of wat/ering holes likely to s\c【are /of/f bargain hunters, they【 may yet succeed\.【Madein Saleh, 【near Al UlaEuronews / Rachel Graha/mShare【 】this a\rticle 【【 More from placesiTxq

4.1dhnThe cement industry is r\esponsible for between 6 to 8 per \cent of global carbon【【 di【oxid\e emissions.Re\searchers looking 】into how to impro【ve the situation h【ave designe】d 】and built【【\】 an experime】】nt//al plant at a cement fact【ory in Belgi\um to try to \find soluti【ons.The factory, whi【ch covers around 70 hectare【s and employs 】around 1 workers, produces an estimated 1.4 million tonnes of 1/】 /di【fferent varieties of cemen/t from a common r】aw material: /limestone.But【 this 】comes wit/h an en】vironmental cost:/"I/f 【we produce one tonne of cement, we generate 0.6\ tonnes of carbon dioxide/. \This carbon 【dioxide main【ly c\omes from】 our raw m】ater【ial】s," s/ays Ja\n 】Theulen, direct/】or of】 al】ternative resource】s at \Heidelberg 】cement.Therefo/re, we need\ to de/velop】 te\chnologies to capture this c\arbon dioxide so that it is not e【mitted to the env/\ir【onment."The factory \has teamed up 【】with rese【archers from the Europea/【n research project, Leilac (\Low Emissions Intensity Lim】e And Cement)】 to search【 for such 】technolog/\ie\s.The outcome is a 6【0-meter/ high plant wit】h a pi【lot reactor th】at&\acute;'s alre\ady able to a/bsor【\【b 5 per c】ent of t】he f\actory&\acu】】te【;s total carbon dioxide emissi】ons\."【Ther\e is a big metal tube/ that´s heat\ed on t/he\ outside 【at /around【 a 1,000 deg】rees.\ The raw material is dropped in the top an\d it falls slowly d/own/. As this mate】rial】 gets heated,】/ it r/ele/ases its carbon d/ioxide. A\n【d th】is pure carbon dioxide c【an sim/ply be captured a【t the to/p," e】xpla\】in】s Leilac project coordin】ator, Daniel Rennie.Researche/rs say the tech】nology \requires 【minimal /chan【ges i【n the factory】&acut\e;s \con/ventional chain of 】cement production, \enabling the capture 】of ca\rbon dioxid【e with/o\ut additional chemicals.Bu/t there are stil】/l differ/ent【 challenges】 th\at need to be addressed."The materi】al /has to be【 able to flow 】do\wn the re】actor. It f】lows down the\ rea/ctor/, b】ut】/ then at the bottom, it n\eeds/ to be co/nveyed \i/n】to the o【th】er units /on sit\e," sa】y/s T/homas Hills, a process engineer, at Calix."T/he 】other/\ impo/rtant technical/ par/amet】ers are ensur\i【ng tha【t we get enough heat into】 the reacto【r and that we put this h【eat in t【h/e right places."The a/i】\m is to be ab】le 】to absorb as mu\ch carb】on 【diox\ide as possible in the safest, m/ost【/ en【erg】y-efficient way.Researc\hers n】eed to constantly assess the safety and efficiency of the whole/【 proce/ss \bo\th】 【\i【\n a co/ntroll/ed laboratory environment and in the\ reactor its\elf\."We take the powder 【befor】e it /go/\es in and measure t/he amount o【f c\arbon dioxide t【hat goes in】 it,"】 】says Hills."Then we measure after pass\ing throu/gh the 【reactor, and we measure【 【that amount of \c/arbon dioxi【de in the powder. And the di/】【ffer】ence is t//he amount \that we cap【tur【e."Researchers\ are now working 】to scale up the tec【hnology 】to captu\re 95 p】er】 cent of the fact/ory´s global carbon dioxide emissio】ns with a view to dev】elopi\ng other circular【 economy 】business models."Be/caus/e we 】are expecting very pure carbon dioxi\de to 】【be cap【tu/red, with】 some purification steps it can /【be/ used for the foo\d industry, it// can \be used for /growing/ plants, it【 can be used for helping /make n】ew fuels, /it can even 【be used in/ m【aterials to help build new prod【ucts【, " says Daniel】 Rennie.\Researchers be【liev\e the t\echn/olog/y can contr\i【bute to reaching the target of 80% re\duction in 【car\bon dioxide emissions i/n Eu】rope by 2050.Journalist name • Ka\ty Dar【t/for/dShare this 】articleCopy/paste the articl】e video embed link below】:Co【pyShareTweetShar【/esendSh【areTwe】etSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【】are】ShareSh\a】r\eSendShareShar【eY】o】u might also like \ 【 / 】 \ How to increase bio/div/ersity acros】s cities / \ \ \ 】 \ 】 N【e【【w windturbines for green e【ne【rg【/y, che】ape【r a】nd \quicker to build 】 More a】boutIndustry】New technologiesE\n/vir【onmental protec/tion 】 \ Most viewe/d / W\/hat i\nfluence on \climate is the coronavirus lockdown really ha\ving【【?【 【 【 \ Th【\e ne【w AI system safeguarding prema【ture bab/ies from infect【ion / 】 】 /】 【 Messenger RNA: \the molecul【e \that /may teach 】o】ur bodies to beat \cancer / 【 / \ 【Apple an】d Google say t】hey'll work together to trace s【pre【ad /of coron\avi/rus via smartphones 【\ 】 【】 How EU funding is changing the f/ace of Latvia【n innovat/ion 【【 \ Browse today/'s 】ta/gsdhJW

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dDua/Join us in t\his i\mmersive 36/0° experience onboard "/B】roodw/inner" - a /29 metre bea/m trawler built// in【 1967 a/nd used to train/ you】ng fisherme【n in Belgium.The vessel, renova【\ted a 【f【ew years ago with the supp】ort of the Euro】pea/n 】Maritime and 【Fis/heries F/und, has everything necessary to p】/rovide fut/ure maritime professiona【l】s\ with ha/】nds-on ex】perience./B】art De Waegenare, a te【acher a\t the Maritie【m Instituut Merca/tor in 【Ostend, \superv\is\es a】 group of l】o\】cal students on/ their training trip."T/he】【y】 come f/rom everywh】】ere in Belgium. /They start at 12-13 years of age, and they sta/y u/ntil 18."The f\irst and the second year clas【ses 【go to】 sea /ev】ery】 \n\ow 【and【 then, but the th】ird and /fourth】 year students go out e/very two week】\/s with t】he vessel — eve【r【y tw【o wee/ks for 【a whole s\chool year."That’s normal\ working hours, between 080/0 and 1600 &m\dash; so/ fo\r 】eight hours a day/, t\hey are at /sea."We /try to t/each them /to be a fis/herma】n — fr】om t\he begi\nning. What is a fis【hing boat, what d】o you/ have to do,/ it’s normal working cond【iti【ons f【/【or a beam trawler【."We teach them t\o work safe\ly】 【— safet\y he】lmet, saf【ety】 device for 】when/ 【they fal】l overboard — that&rsquo】;s never happened, but【 you never know【. So that&r/squo;s also an importan\t part. Working w【ith fish /— 【they have to clean the 【\fish, things 】lik【e that. And /naviga】ting th/e/ vessel also."They really see what it is\, getting their first impression \her\e.\ A/nd then when they get older, they g】et technical cl】a/sses, and t】he older g】u】【\】/ys /\h\ere go to sea on professional fishing vessel\s. There they see real life at a workplace. A】nd that,\ in \my opi\nion\, i\s when they /make/ a choice to do \it — o】r not to d\o it."Journalist name • Denis】 LoctierSh\are this articl【eShareTweetSharesend】/ShareTweetShar【esendMoreHide/ShareSendShareShareSha【reSendSh/areShare\More \aboutOceanFisheryEnvironmental protectionYouth360° vid\eo 】 【 【】 Most viewed / \ /What influence on clim/a【te/ is th\e coronavirus lockdown really having? / 【 / T\【he new AI system 【safeguarding pre/mature babies from infec\tion / \ \ 】 【 / 】 Messenger R\NA:【 \the molecule\ that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 】 / Apple and Google\ say they'll wo/rk toget【her t】o trace spread of coronavirus via smartphon】es \ 【 【 】 \ How EU funding is \chan\ging th【e fac【e of L\a/】tvian\ innovat】ion 【 / \ 【 Browse today's t/【ag/sQn1X

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LpaxText si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】acesmXiL

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T5YqThe climat【e em】erg】e/ncy is 】no】t th/e【 only\ en【viron\】me【ntal issu\e th\e world【 i】s strug\/\gli】ng to solve. Plastic \products clog our ocean/s, /thre】atening /marine /life and poll【uting the water. At current rates plastic】 is predicted to outweigh all the f\ish in t/h】e sea by the \year 2050. In Holla/nd, a new device 【is a sm\all si】gn of 】hope.】 \'WasteSha/【rk' is a remotely /contro\lled device that 】co【llects rubbish 】from the water.Th】is m/ini-catamaran has been developed to remo【ve plastics and ot/h【er fl】oating debris from\ 【the sur\face of l【akes a【nd oceans/. Its sensors c【an moni/【tor pol】luti【on】 le\【v【el/】s a【n】d】 other environmental ind/icators. It 】is e/lectrically powered, emissio/n-free a】nd can collect hundreds of \kilos o\f rubbish at a /time. Ric/hard Hardiman is the \founder of Ranmarine Technologies, the comp\any responsible fo【r Waste Shark:"What【 we're tryi】/ng to do is cre/\ate a small enough vesse】l that will g【et into tight spac\es where wa/ste c】ol】lects, particularly in the harbours and the port【s,\ and s【top all that waste being take/n out in】to the grea/】ter ocean."I have】 a visio】n in 【my head that /keeps me 】going, that is】 you'd be sit\ting in a/ control room from our\ site 】we could se\e where /eve【ry drone is across/ the p】lane【t, how many\ \are o【perating, how much wast/e is being ca】ught and actually see the real im【pac\t of that these things are\ making a\round the world."\T/his is one of the 】proje\cts that receive/d su】pport from th】】e European funds allocated to】 making plas【t】ic circular. R【anmari/ne 【/is a\ Dutch startup \company and has already g\ot 【cust/o】m/ers】 in several countries. Tessa Despinic is its design en\gineer:"The basi\c function of /t/he】 WasteShark is very simple.【 【It just swims aroun】d and collects tra/sh f/rom the su/rface. 【But inside, it's always chan】ging, we're always try/ing to make 【it light【er, more efficie】nt/, easier to do mainten/a\nce on. And we【're also buil】ding \an autonomous v/ersion that w/ill s】wim a】round accord【ing\ to/ w【】aypoints /that y\ou give】【 it. So we're alw【ays wo/rking o\n that 【and /making】 it better/."Th/e Eu/ropean Union is l】eading the global fight against marine lit】ter. Besides its/ policies curbing single\-us\e plas/】tic【s and r\ed\ucing waste from l/ost\ fishing gear/, the EU ha】s earmarked 】350/ million Euro \【for research a\n/d de】velopment in this area.Watch Good /M/orni【n】g E\urope's report i\n the player\ ab/ove.J\ournalist/ \na\me • Joao Vitor【 Da Silva MarquesVideo editor • Joa】o Vitor Da Silva Marques】/Sha】re this \art\icleCopy/pas\te t/he a\rt/icle\ vi】deo embed link below:CopyShareTwe\etSharesendS/hareTw】ee】tSha\resen】dMoreHide/S【har/eSendShareShar\eShareSen【dS/hareSh【areYou might also like \ 】 C【OP25: C\hile summit/ withdrawa\l /hits tourism \b】/【u【t \opens new door fo\r environment\ a\ctivists / 】 /\ \ 【 / Is Blac/k Friday bad for/ the environment? Activists take on\ 【sh/opping【 fr【enzy 】 】 / C【ol】dplay to /pause touring, cit【ing environmental reasons / More aboutclima【te】 chang\ecli【】】】mate protectio/nClimate emergen【cyClim/a\te crisisEnvironm\ent polluti/onEn/vironmental】【】 protectionHot TopicLearn more about 】 climate chang】e Hot 【TopicLearn more about climat【e change \ Browse today's tagsbjFm

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V7OTSwedish env【ironmental【 activist Greta Thunber/g ha/s 】been speaking about her trip across /the/ Atlantic o【】n an envi】ronmentally-friendly 【yacht. She said the 【/journe【y on the zero-em【is\sions vessel】 "wo】ul【d be challengi/【】ng for 】everyone abo/ard".Thu\nberg will travel on\ t【he/ M/alizi】a II &m】das\h; a\ ra【cing boat fitte\d with solar panels 】and underwa\ter【 t\urbines that generates no carbo【n emissions — to attend the two United Nat\ions【 cli【\ma/\te conference/s in New York and Santiago,】 【Chile. Thunbe\rg】, who re】fuses to take【 aeroplanes because of the/ir imp\act on \the environment, sa】】id the trip would be "qui【te the advent/ure" 】and that【 she "expected it to be 】c【hallenging at tim/es" dur【ing a press confe/rence before her d\eparture.She】 will be joined on the【 jour/n【e【y, which should take around two weeks, by her fathe】r. They will make the cross】in/g with 【captain B\【】oris Herrmann, Pierre Casiraghi,【 th\e grandson Monaco’s late Prince】 Rain\ier III, as well as Natha【n】 Grossman, a document】ary \maker from S\weden.The 】teenag】er said she didn't feel bad\ or a】nxious during t【e】st runs and/ that she only 】exp\erien】/ced seasicknes】s for a few minutes befor\e i】t went away.Ask】ed what sh/e hoped t【o accomplis/h】 with her t】rip, Thunberg \said she hoped to "inc\/re\/as】e】】 awarenes\s amon/g 【peo\ple in general\ so \【【they sta/rt realising /that we are in a【】n【\ emergency."Supporters of the teen\ activist shared their support for her on/ social/ media."The/ yacht【 she will be\ sailing on is a ra【cing yacht and \it is anything but c【o】mfortable. And 】even in a comfortable y】acht】 crossing the Atlantic is no /picn】ic. You g】o girl! Big cudos for finding an alt【ernative to flying【!" wrote one/ user.The Swede said previou/sly that s】he wanted to at\tend】 the summit in New Yo\rk on September 23 b【ut didn'/t k】now h/ow to ge】】t there \without going by plane or cruis\e ship\, \w【hich both have high emissions."Taking a boat】 to/\ No】rth Ame【rica i/s 】b【as【ically im【po\ssible," she 】was\ cite\d by AP as saying.Thunberg took the oppo/rt】un【ity to thank the Mal】\izia II crew】 for helping her w/】ith her /project.According \to Germ【an n\/onprofit Atmos\fair, roundtrip from 【London to New/【 York gener/ates on average【 986kg of CO per pa【ssenger. While the Mal/izia II 】】runs on sola\r-powe\r and und】erwater \turbines\ generating el\ectr【ical p】ow/er with 【zero carbon emissions.It is not k\nown how Th//】u【nberg, 】who is ta【k/ing a sabbatical i/】n t\he US, will ret】urn to Europe.Share \this articleS\【hareTwee\tShar\e【send/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSend【Share\S】h/\areSha\reSendS/h\areShare/You migh//t【 also li/【ke / / / 】 \ Watch: Gre】ta Thunber】g sails into New York for UN】 climate \change【 summits【 / 【 'Shock&\#039; as s【【cienti【】sts find 【plastic \microbead【s in /remote Arc/tic ice】 \ 【【 \ 】 Is Christma】s d/】estroyin\g the planet? \ / 【More abou\tGreta ThunbergEnvironmen\tEnvironmental protection Browse today�【39;s tagsKuQg

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